Albee American Dream

Edward Label is considered by many to be one of the most influential playwrights of the seventeenth century. Label wrote his plays around the typical themes associated with the American drama. They were not Just plays about family life; instead, they frequently focused on family dysfunctions and the underlying motives of family structure. In his works, Label portrays many of the concepts of the absurdly movement that had begun in Europe after World War II. This movement was a reaction to the many injustices brought along with the war Itself.

One of the major outfits present is the idea that the playwright possessed little or no concern for traditional play structure and form. A second prominent trait of the absurdly movement Is the lack of effective communication between the plays major characters. Labels play, “The American Dream,” Is an accurate depiction of the popular trends associated with the movement’s establishment In America. As Label quotes, “The play Is an examination of the American Scene, an attack on the substitution of artificial for real values In out society, a condemnation of complacency, realty, emasculation and vacuity. The first conclusion that Label makes in reference to “The American Dream” is that it is a portrayal of how artificial values have replaced real values in the American society. This theme is apparent in the study of how the family replaces Grandma with the Young Man. To Label, Grandma represents the way life used to be, a time when real values and self-worth mattered. Grandma is an overall depiction of how American’s have not learned from their past. Instead, they “talk past it” and ignore its existence.

Label teaches that the past holds the truth to our future when he gives Grandma the ability to reveal the truth for Mrs.. Baker’s visit, and the knowledge that the Young Man is the identical twin of the family’s first son. The family’s ignorance of Grandma is obvious in analyzing her comment to Mrs.. Baker; “Oh my; that feels good. It’s been so long since anybody had implored me. Do it again. Implore me some more. ” Mommy and Daddy have become accustomed to ignoring the old ways and looking for a new set of values.

Throughout the course of the play, Mommy and Daddy are looking for satisfaction. Daddy says to Mommy, “That’s the way things are today; you Just can’t get satisfaction; you Just try. ” They are not happy with the way things are, representing the real values, and are trying to find satisfaction, or an artificial set of values. Mommy constantly threatens Grandma with being sent away to a nursing home, however, she explains to Mrs.. Baker, “There’s no such thing as the van man. There Is no van man. We… We made him up. However, when Grandma leaves, Mommy Is feely upset until she Is surprised with the presence of the Young Man. The sole purpose for the parents keeping Grandma around Is found In the fact that she represented the old set of values. They could not send her away until she had been replaced, replaced with a new, artificial set of values. Label’s Ideas toward the new set of values is present when the Young Man replies to Grandma, “l have no talents at incomplete, and I must therefore… Compensate. ” This new set of standards revolves around the artificial qualities of looks, money, and power.